Things I’m Reading

IMG_20131112_172143[1]

I read an essay yesterday that changed my life and today I will read something-or-other that will probably change my life. A few words tacked together which will alter my paradigm of understanding like tectonic plates, sometimes with the seismic force of new mountains and sometimes a delicate, almost undetectable shift. Always significant.

Every piece I’ve read recently has resonated; I’ve thought of each story–or the images–many, many times after finishing it. I’ve been moved by the humanity of these writers, moved, in particular, by a refusal to hide. Like they cut themselves open down the sternum and bled out all over the page. Except it’s beautiful and doesn’t feel desperate. It gives me hope, as someone who’d like to write, that our experiences really are universal, that even in their acute specificity our personal stories cross over all the boundaries we try to erect and make us different for having read them.

If you read any of these, read Strayed. You might not understand how she copes with her grief, you might not approve, but you will feel it in your protons. Try to get past yourself so you can truly hear. Note the rhythm of her sentences and do not shy away from her pain.


Essays and Stories:

“Love Of My Life” by Cheryl Strayed

“Strange Beads” by Wendy Brenner

“The Tracks” Karen K. Ford

“Seven Waves for Good Luck” Stephanie Early Green

The entire Current Issue of Brevity Magazine

Books:

The White Album by Joan Didion (find more Didion here)

Poems:

To Bedlam and Part Way Back by Anne Sexton

Selected Poems and Letter of Emily Dickinson by Robert N. Linscott



Wishing you a weekend full of words.

signature

 


 


 

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. I’m just seeing this now, several months too late, but thank you so much for linking to my story, and I’m really glad it resonated with you. I poked around your blog and really enjoyed it; keep up the good work! — Stephanie Early Green

  2. Ned

    Your descriptive writing is so clear and sharp I love it also I love how you so clearly describe the universal desire in all people for connection and commonality that in essence we all have the same yearning and experience but we interpret, respond and hide these in different ways

leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: